Importance of separating MT and LT

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Importance of separating MT and LT

Post by pintpursuits on Thu Aug 17, 2017 3:43 pm

Hi all,

Other than time-savings while doing batches back to back which is obvious, what are the pro's and advantages to having a separate mash tun vessel (whether it be on its own or MT/BK) and lauter tun vessel? Or if I'm not worried about time savings (ie. brewing once per day) is a combo vessel just as useful?

Open to hearing all opinions, your setups, as I know there are a lot of routes that can be taken here.

Cheers

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Re: Importance of separating MT and LT

Post by TBAvery on Mon Aug 28, 2017 2:51 pm

We have a combo vessel here and have had zero issues with efficiency/lautering/sparging. I'm also curious what the advantages of having two vessels are, other than for saving time.

In order for us to do two batches simultaneously, we actually installed a whirlpool last November so we can empty the kettle much sooner.


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Re: Importance of separating MT and LT

Post by Whitewater Sean on Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:35 am

I agree there is no benefit to separating MLT to MT/LT other than time savings. If they were heated you could do decoctions mashes with this setup. That may be a benefit if that what you want to do.
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Re: Importance of separating MT and LT

Post by eallured on Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:49 am

The biggest advantage is being able to have multiple mash temperature rests. While not totally necessary with well-modified, quality malts, there are still reasons for rests. A low temperature rest can be helpful to break down glucans, especially if using lots of rye or unmalted grains. There is debate whether a protein rest is helpful or not to head retention, but most Belgians believe it's helpful and necessary to achieve the stable foam they are famous for (high CO2 volumes helps as well obviously). Ferulic acid rest for hefeweizens is something many Germans will swear by. You can also do a true "mash out" rest to inactivate your enzymes so you can lock in your wort fermentability before running into the kettle. All of these are very good reasons to get a jacketed separate MT, but you have to consider what kind of beers you are making and whether it will be worth the extra investment in capital and floor space.

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